A World Music Magazine
                      

world music Ásgeir Ásgeirsson is an Icelandic player of bouzouki, saz and more. Since 2017 he has been creating a big, beautifully executed project: a trilogy of albums of Icelandic folk songs and melodies from Bjarni Thorsteinsson's 1905 collection, interpreted and developed from the perspective of the traditions of Turkey, Bulgaria and Iran. Featuring top musicians from those places, with the songs largely performed by Icelandic singer Sigrídur Thorlacius, they were recorded in studios in Iceland, Bulgaria, Greece, Turkey, the Netherlands, Iran and India.

This year brings the final album, Icelandic Folksongs Volume 3, Persian Path. Its instrumentation comprises a rich orchestral blend of qanun, santur, oud, ney, kamanche, qeychak, setar, violin, cello, percussion and Ásgeirsson's instruments which here include touches of guitar synth. They mould themselves to the Icelandic material, elaborating and extending it with arrangement and composition by Ásgeirsson and the players. The result is a sweeping, indeed epic, flow of melodies. Read Andrew Cronshaw's review and listen to some of all three recordings in the series.

 

world music "Inside my mountain, hay un misterio."
With these suggestive words, the first line of the first track of Oye Mujer (Listen Up, Woman), Ladama lays down their brand of sexual politics vaunting empowerment and liberation on their own terms. Ladama (La Dama—the lady, without a facetious undertone) is an all women collective of players from the Latin American world, including the US. Ladama isn't intent to merely throw down a velvet gauntlet of sexual empowerment. The group has also taken up, notably as women, the web of urgencies of the day, including global warming, homelessness, poverty, immigration, indigenous rights, and more. Ladama is not just a mouthpiece against indignity: these women are serious musicians, all, and care equally about their art as players, composers, lyricists and arrangers, achieved, they are proud to disclose, collectively. Their commitment to mastery as women musicians engages the listener, lending more agency to their message. Read Carolina Amoruso's review and listen.

 

world music Makgona Tsohle Reggi is a collection of ska and jerk-inspired instrumentals by the Makgona Tsohle Band. But this is decidedly not a reggae or ska record. What it is instead is a collection of twelve sharp, terse performances featuring organ-drenched staccato chug, guitars that seem to push past the limits of their amplifiers, and saxophones-as-human-voice, all buoyed by drum patterns that skitter and jab. And while the influence of Jamaica is present, it melds so effortlessly with South Africa's own sounds of the era as to have ended up producing a type of raw, garage groove that occasionally defies geographical identity altogether. Listen to the music and read Bruce Miller's review.

 

world music It's been a lousy year, but one would never know it listening to Sharon Shannon's joyous new album The Reckoning, which was conceived, made remotely and released through the early months of the coronavirus pandemic. We've been told that during this dark, turbulent and grueling year to find our little joys. And damned if Shannon hasn't done just that, finding joy in her squeezebox, tootling out tunes with a band of co-conspirators from around the world, managing a virtual worldwide trip while staying locked down in her County Galway home. Read Marty Lipp's review.

 

world music The story on how Rafael Machuca, a Colombia tax lawyer, came to own and operate Colombia's most eccentric record label is almost as odd as the sounds found in this collection. The tale goes something like this: Machuca was in charge of finding live music for a lawyers directors' party, and, having no clue how to search for traditional sounds, contacted his brother-in-law, Humberto Castillo, a record dealer in Medellin. Castillo traveled up country and helped Machuca find a variety of Barranquilla nightspots full of local talent that no one had thought to record. The long and short of all this is that Machuca, a man who previously had no interest in music, much less the music business, became infatuated with what he heard, joined one band on tour and ultimately used his tax knowledge to form a label with contacts and suggestions for musicians by Castillo. Out of this came a half decade of coastal Colombia's most outrageous psychedelic rhythms. Machuca encouraged single-takes, and at times, put together bands out of whoever was around, meaning some of these "groups" he recorded never existed outside of the one or two sides they waxed for the label. The music on La Lorcura de Machuca 1975-1980 is well-grounded in Cumbia and Vallenato, so its roots aren't obscured so much as decked out in glow-in-the-dark feathers and high-heels. Read Bruce Miller's review and listen to a few tracks.

 

world music Cimarrón is a Colombian group playing llanero joropo music, the music of Colombia's north-eastern plains (los llanos). In October, they performed live from the river and savannahs in the Orinoco Plains. Watch the impressive full video (24 minutes) and read a short intro to their music by Andrew Cronshaw.

 

world music The term "Afro-Futurism," supposedly coined in 1993, but certainly put into practice philosophically and otherwise way before then, has been receiving much attention over the last few years. And it makes sense too. When a group of people- jailed, shot by police, denied fair housing, wages, or equity with regards to all manners of health and educational issues- finds itself systemically deprived of justice, a look to sci-fi and other ways to use the future as a way to escape the present is one logical reaction to various forms of oppression. The idea of space travel, both figurative and literal, is what fueled the music and writings of master bandleader, composer, and keyboard wizard Sun Ra... It only makes sense that Canadian-Malian artist Djely Tapa would embrace the term as a way to update griot traditions as a form of feminism. She has harnessed rhythms and stories at their root, but delivered them coated in dub murk and trippy electronics. Tapa grew up in Kayes, learning the music of the griots to whom she was related, all the while finding herself fascinated with Western culture. Eventually moving to Montreal to study Mechanical Engineering, she fell in with the cities massive African Diaspora and dug back into her griot-based roots. Eventually, she connected with Chadian-Canadian DJ AfrotroniX, who produced Barokan. Read Bruce Miller's review and listen to some of the music.

 

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About RootsWorld: RootsWorld is a world music magazine started in 1993, pretty much at the dawn of the term "world music" as well as the pre-dawn of internet publishing (I suspect this was the first music magazine of any sort published on the www). Our focus is the music of the world: Africa, Asia, Europe, Pacifica and The Americas, the roots of the global musical milieu that has come to be known as world music, be it traditional folk music, jazz, rock or some hybrid. How is that defined? I don't know and don't particularly care at this point: it's music from someplace you aren't, music with roots, music of the world and for the world. OK?

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